020 3198 1101

Phone

Contact Us

Email

Air Conditioning
Refrigeration
Ventilation
Maintenance

Home Air Conditioning

Thursday 16 August 2018

Air Conditioning in The Home: The Nursery

We all know how much more comfortable a room is when it is at just the right temperature. We sleep deeper, longer, and wake feeling more refreshed. Numerous studies support this understanding, proving time and time again that air temperature impacts REM sleep, the deepest part of the sleep cycle.

[1] So, you won’t be surprised to hear that the temperature of a nursery can greatly impact how your baby sleeps too. While there are plenty of options out there for season-specific bedding for children, these don’t help with the fluctuating temperature overnight. In fact, they can even restrict the self-regulation of body temperature, causing your child to wake more often. Instead of tailoring your bedding to the age and size of your child, as well as the season and climate of the surrounding environment, why not focus on stabilising the air temperature instead?

Not only can the air temperature of a nursery reduce REM sleep in infants, but studies have shown that air pollution in London is a factor in low birth weights in children.

[2] A study conducted by the King’s College and Imperial College’s of London was conducted over a 4 year period, in the greater London area. In total, the birth weights of 540,365 babies were analysed, and findings showed that 3% of low birth weight cases could be directly attributed to the levels of residential road traffic air pollution experience by the mother during pregnancy.

[3] In fact, the Royal College of Physicians, London have published a report about the lifelong effects of air pollution and are calling for changes to be made.

[4] It’s been established that the conditions outside of your home have a direct impact on your family. With the recent heatwave, and news stories on rising pollution within the capital, we’ve had a growing number of clients contact us over the last few months to enquire how air conditioning can help to stabilise the temperature and air quality in their home, and specifically in the bedrooms of their children. Whether you’re looking to regulate the climate in a nursery alone, or throughout your house, there are a variety of options available to you.

Depending on your requirements, budget, and the layout of your home, there are multiple solutions to meet your needs. For standard residential homes, where climate control is desired in every room of the house, a split system will provide year-round comfort in every room, pulling fresh air into your home which is filtered of allergens and pollutants. If your options for an external unit are limited due to owning a listed building or living in an apartment, the invisible Daikin system may be perfect for you, similar to a multi-split system, the invisible option can house concealed ‘external’ units within roof space, wardrobes, utility rooms – anywhere you have the space. If you’re working to a tight budget, or perhaps just want to focus on a nursery which is too hot (often due to being south-facing or located at the top of a house) or is street-facing, preventing fresh air from circulating, a single wall mounted system could be the best solution for you. Our range of air conditioners are equipped with a heat exchange system to warm up cool air, so you can use them year-round for total comfort and peace of mind. Whatever form your home comes in, there is an air-conditioning system that can be tailored for you.

We know the last thing you want is for installation work to undo the great space in your nursery. So, once we’ve installed your system, we take care of any carpentry or decorating work that’s needed to put the room back to its former state. Get in touch with iClimate Solutions today to discuss how we can improve the quality of living for you, and your family.

 

home air conditioning

Sources:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3427038/

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22726801

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5712860/

[4] https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/projects/outputs/every-breath-we-take-lifelong-impact-air-pollution